mileaux:

rojoninja:

trebled-negrita-princess:

stfusexists:

feminismandpugsarelife:

heremotionsickness:

Reblogging because I want all of my followers to be aware of just how much you can do in Photoshop, and how little of what you see on posters, in magazines and of pictures on the internet etc. are necessarily real. 

Imagine how the model feels, too. She was hired to be the most beautiful, but they still had to change her because her beauty wasn’t enough.

Not only is the general body distortion completely gross, but notice that they lighten her skin color. This is a white, blonde model, and they make her whiter. Actual white people aren’t even the ideal whiteness, so can you even imagine what models with dark skin have to endure in this industry?

so for all you girls that ask “Why can’t I look like the girls in magazines” it’s because the girls in magazines don’t even look like the girls in magazines.

yeah but

ROJO WHAT THE SHIT

#postproduction #photoshop

(via ruinleon)

visual-poetry:

by victoria siemer
[via]

#visualart visual-poetry:

by victoria siemer
[via]

#visualart visual-poetry:

by victoria siemer
[via]

#visualart visual-poetry:

by victoria siemer
[via]

#visualart visual-poetry:

by victoria siemer
[via]

#visualart visual-poetry:

by victoria siemer
[via]

#visualart
slowartday:

Chuck Sperry slowartday:

Chuck Sperry slowartday:

Chuck Sperry slowartday:

Chuck Sperry
slowartday:

Illustrations by Yuki Kitazumi slowartday:

Illustrations by Yuki Kitazumi slowartday:

Illustrations by Yuki Kitazumi slowartday:

Illustrations by Yuki Kitazumi slowartday:

Illustrations by Yuki Kitazumi
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.
I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.
My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 
That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.
There is no limit.
Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?
Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.
I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram

myampgoesto11:

Brooklyn artist Stephen Shaheen sets out to carve the largest collection of bone sculptures out of marble

My name is Stephen Shaheen, and I’m an artist living in Brooklyn, New York.  I’m working on a really exciting sculpture installation that I hope you join me in creating.

I’m carving bones out of marble.  A lot of bones.

My ultimate goal is to make a huge sculptural installation by the end of 2015.  How big?  The size of this artwork will be scaled by YOU! 

That is, for every person who donates, the installation is going to grow. Whether you want me to make a hundred or a thousand, I’m going to sculpt one marble bone for every $100 received.

There is no limit.

Why Bones?  Why Kickstarter?

Bones are fascinating as abstract, sculptural forms.  Yet they also contain the same calcium that forms the geologic “bones” of the earth.  Marble is literally the crystalized skeletons of ancient sea life.  Even its veining reminds me of our own physiology.  I want to offer a poetic interpretation of these complex relationships in an immense assemblage of marble bones.

I am a believer in the limitless and unforeseeable potential of collaborative art…crowd-sourced projects take on a life of their own, continually evolving through the transformative power of the collective.  Between 2002 and 2011, hundreds of helpers joined me to create a 100-ton marble and granite 9/11 memorial in Highlands, New Jersey, which was completely crowd-sourced—both in donations of materials and cash, as well as the contribution of multiple hands in the actual sculpting process.

find out more about this project by visiting his Kickstarter page HERE

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

(via actegratuit)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon. darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon
Manicomio
“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Raymond Depardon

Manicomio

“In 1977, I met Franco Basaglia, director of the manicomico (lunatic asylum) at the hospital in Triest, who was also the leader of an alternative psychiatric movement. Taking advantage of the chaotic political situation in Italy at the time, he started to close several psychiatric hospitals with a group of doctors, and had ‘Law 180’ passed in 1978, which resulted in the definitive closure of the asylums. Franco encouraged me to take photographs of this reality, ‘If not, they will not believe us,’ he told me.

With more than a hundred thousand people interned in psychiatric asylums all over Italy, the situation was indeed dramatic. He also introduced me to directors of other asylums in Venice, Naples, Arezzo and Turin.

For four years, until the closure of the hospital on the island of San Clemente very close to Venice, I photographed these places of pain to preserve them in memory and to pay tribute to Franco Basaglia – who died from a sudden illness in 1980. My film about San Clemente came out in 1982, but it’s only now thirty years later – after a long pause – that I have finally edited and designed the photographic work that was begun all those years ago.” Raymond Depardon.